michaelgraaf

If any further proof was needed, this Ukraine business has highlighted the insufficiency of a left/right political continuum. Maybe it's still useful specifically in the economic realm – to denote a person's or group's policy concerning concentration of wealth.

An old saying goes: anti-semitism is the socialism of fools. At its most simplistic, the truth it contains is illustrated by someone feeling oppressed by say, Jewish bankers (and probably blind to Jewish poverty). The person might recognise that not all bankers are Jewish, but still associates oppressive banks with Jewishness – when of course, banking itself is oppressive (unless actively prevented from being so, e.g. by being co-operative).

Since Hitler publicly shat in the (already contaminated) swimming-pool of anti-semitism, many of its proponents euphemise their bigotry by being “anti-globalist.” They are then able to mingle among many non-anti-semites who also demonise “globalism” as the antithesis of patriotism/family/whatever identity-political label they wear (of course, to push the analogy to its limit, some pool-party-goers are too drunk or olfactory-impaired to be put off from swimming).

At its most absurd, such anti-globalism consists of condemning the WEF as “communist.” In this benighted worldview, capitalism and socialism aren't rival economic systems, but opposite “ways of life.” From here, it's a slippery slope down to Pizzagate, Q-Anon and other delusions where evil is personified as paedophilic vampire reptiles or whatever.

The “way-of-life” view of communism is also of an antithesis: the opposite of “our freedom” or “our religion” – even though these last are usually mere facades for exploitation or hypocrisy.

One can even discern a form of anti-globalism among the left; an assertion that while capitalism is bad, locally-loyal capitalists aren't quite as bad as the jet-setting, tax-haven-domiciled ones. On closer inspection, this loyalty often isn't as sincere as it could be – while money opens global doors, the price goes up if, say, you are brown (or, these days, Russian). So the “patriotic bourgeois” makes a virtue of a necessity: they ostentatiously shun the cosmopolitan elite because it doesn't welcome them as warmly as they would like.